Keynote Speakers / Plenary Speakers

Thomas R. Henderson
Richard M. Fujimoto
Bernard P. Zeigler
Richard Black



Keynote1
Thomas R. Henderson
The Boeing Company, and Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington

Abstract

   Slides

Improving Simulation Credibility through Open Source Simulators
Several network researchers have lamented that while the use of simulation for network research continues to rise, the credibility of simulation studies erodes. In this talk, I will introduce some of the designs and processes being used to build a new open source networking simulator called ns-3. Intended to eventually replace the popular ns-2 simulator, ns-3 aims to retain features of ns-2 that have made the latter successful, while remedying some complaints about ns-2. I will share some perspective on the role of simulation in the current networking research landscape, and describe how ns-3, related tools, and the research community might address some of the credibility problems with network simulation.


Biography

Thomas R. Henderson is an Associate Technical Fellow with The Boeing Company, and an Affiliate Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington. He holds a B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley. Since 2006, he has been the PI of the NSF-funded ns-3 simulation project. Prior to ns-3, he has been a user, developer, and maintainer of ns-2 dating to 1997, and has developed ns-2 courseware for an undergraduate networking course at the University of Washington. At Boeing, he has served as the co-PI and Technical Lead for five Office of Naval Research (ONR) research programs, and has participated in numerous internal research and development efforts. Throughout his career, he has been active in Internet, ATM, and ISDN standards work. He is presently the co-chair of the Host Identity Protocol (HIP) research group at the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) and is a member of the Internet Research Steering Group (IRSG). Prior to Boeing, he was a founding engineer and director, respectively, at two technology-based startups in the Bay Area, and worked for several years as a Member of Technical Staff at COMSAT Laboratories.

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Keynote2
Richard M. Fujimoto
Parallel and Distributed Simulation, College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology

Abstract

   Slides

   Introductory slides for the round table

Ad Hoc Distributed Simulations
The last decade has seen dramatic advances in the development and deployment of technologies for sensors, mobile computing, and wireless communication networks. At the same time, use of on-line simulation as a means to better manage and control operational systems has been receiving increased attention. On-line simulations, fed by real-time data, can rapidly predict future system states for use in planning and system management. Applications arise in many diverse areas such as manufacturing, supply chain optimization, and transportation system operations, to mention a few. As mobile and ubiquitous computing and communications see increased deployment, embedded on-line simulation will be of growing importance in the years ahead, and potentially could become pervasive in everyday life.

We envision a world where embedded on-line simulations are ubiquitous and play a fundamental role in creating large, complex self-managed distributed systems. We refer to collections of autonomous, embedded on-line simulations that have overlapping areas of interest as ad hoc distributed simulations. Ad hoc distributed simulations represent a fundamental shift in methods for modeling and predicting future states of operational systems. They offer the potential of increased accuracy, responsiveness, and robustness compared to centralized approaches. They differ from conventional distributed simulations in that they are created in a bottom-up rather than a top-down fashion. I will discuss the ad hoc distributed simulation concept as well as several key issues and possible solution approaches that come into play in creating an effective ad hoc distributed simulation system. Embedded transportation simulations in vehicles and roadside infrastructure are used as a motivating example to explain the ad hoc distributed simulation approach.


Biography

Richard Fujimoto is a Professor and Chair of the Computational Science and Engineering Division of the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from the University of California (Berkeley) in 1980 and 1983 (Computer Science and Electrical Engineering) and B.S. degrees from the University of Illinois (Urbana) in 1977 and 1978 (Computer Science and Computer Engineering).

Professor Fujimoto's research is concerned with the execution of discrete-event simulation programs on parallel and distributed computing platforms. This research has included work on platforms ranging from mobile distributed computing systems to cluster computers to supercomputers. This work has included several application areas including transportation systems, telecommunication networks, multiprocessor systems, and defense systems. He lead the working group that was responsible for defining the time management services for the Department of Defense High Level Architecture (HLA) effort (IEEE Standard 1516).

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Keynote3
Bernard P. Zeigler
Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and Arizona Center for Integrative Modeling and Simulation

Abstract

   Slides

DEVS and SES as a Framework for Modeling and Simulation Tool Development
Discrete-Event Systems Specification (DEVS) is a system-theory based framework for modeling and simulation (M&S) that provides a sound basis for model manipulation and execution. The System Entity Structure, (SES) a knowledge representation formalism that focuses on elements and relationships that are fundamental to model composition, validation, reuse, and interoperability. Together, DEVS and SES specify families of hierarchical, modular simulation models and can be viewed as an ontology framework for M&S. In this talk, we discuss recent extensions to DEVS and SES that serve as the basis for robust and effective M&S tools. simplify the creation of architectural models for complex information systems. We show how the SES has been given a natural language front-end that simplifies front-end development and back-end processes that support pruning and mapping to DEVS models. Further, we discuss a finite state abstraction of the full DEVS formalism that is amenable to verification analysis and supports automated test generation. Further, it provides executable skeletons that can be extended to achieve full DEVS capability. These tools are integrated into DEVS/SOA, an implementation of DEVS to provide web-based modeling and simulation services employing the infrastructure and standards of the Service Oriented Architecture . To illustrate, we discuss applications to model-driven system development of real-time complex command, control, and information systems employing model and simulation-based software engineering and automated testing of net-centric systems.

Background for the talk can be found in the book:

Modeling&Simulation-Based Data Engineering:
Introducing Pragmatics into Ontologies for Net-Centric Information Exchange
Bernard P. Zeigler and Phillip E. Hammonds


Biography

Bernard P. Zeigler is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona, Tucson and Director of the Arizona Center for Integrative Modeling and Simulation. He is internationally known for his 1976 foundational text Theory of Modeling and Simulation, recently revised for a second edition (Academic Press, 2000), He has published numerous books and research publications on the Discrete Event System Specification (DEVS) formalism. In 1995, he was named Fellow of the IEEE in recognition of his contributions to the theory of discrete event simulation. In 2000 he received the McLeod Founderís Award by the Society for Computer Simulation, its highest recognition, for his contributions to discrete event simulation. In June 2002, he was elected President of the Society (recently, renamed The Society for Modeling and Simulation, International.) In 2003, his autobiographical retrospective on the evolution of the theory of modeling and simulation appeared in the International Journal of General Systems. (Vol. 32 (3)).

Zeigler served on two National Research Council committees to recommend directions for information technology and simulation modeling in the 21st Century and a third NRC committee that developed a book of recommendations on simulation enhancements to systems acquisition and manufacturing. He has given numerous keynote talks, tutorials and short courses, and organized symposia and conferences that were the first to promote modeling and simulation fundamentals and theory and has been a participant in recent workshops on the science of simulation. In 2001, with Hessam Sarjoughian and other faculty, he founded the Arizona Center for Integrative Modeling and Simulation dedicated to the development of modeling and simulation as a discipline of the future.

Zeigler is currently heading a project for the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) where he is leading the design of the future architecture for large distributed simulation events for the Joint Distributed Engineering Plant (JDEP). He is also developing DEVS-methodology approaches for testing mission thread end-to-end interoperability and combat effectiveness of Defense Department acquisitions and transitions to the Global Information Grid with its Service Oriented Architecture (GIG/SOA). He received the JITC Golden Eagle Award for research and development of the Automated Test Case Generator, 2005 and the Award for Best M&S Development in the Cross-functional Area, 2004/2005, by the National Training Simulation Association, May 2, 2006. He is preparing a book on the methodology of M&S-based dynamic data engineering to be published by Academic Press (2007).

He was appointed Fellow of the Society for Modeling and Simulation, International (SCS), 2006.

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Keynote4
Richard Black
Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK

Abstract

   Slides

The role of simulation in technology transfer
This talk is about the role of simulation in technology transfer. The talk looks at this topic through three case studies from the author's personal experience. In each study, simulation played some role in the development of an innovation from idea to 800 million customers. The three case studies are 1. a topology discovery algorithm, 2. a LAN discovery protocol, and 3. a variant of the well known Transport Control Protocol.

For each case study the author gives a little background on the technology involved, describes how he used simulation as a tool in the innovation process, and talks about the benefits he obtained from simulation, focusing specifically on aspects which he believes are likely to be beneficial for others to learn from.


Biography

Richard is currently a Research Software Development Engineer at Microsoft Research Cambridge, where he is part of the Systems and Networking group. His research interests include performance analysis of distributed systems, operating systems and networking. Recent projects include: Constellation, and Network Inference. The Network Inference project gave rise to the Network Map feature of Windows Vista. Underlying the Network Map feature is the LLTD protocol which is licensed by many companies as part of the Windows Rally program.

Richard obtained his B.A. in Computer Science from the University of Cambridge in 1990 and his Ph.D. addressing issues in operating systems and networking interaction in 1995. After a further three years at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory as a research associate and research fellow he moved in 1997 to a lectureship at the University of Glasgow Department of Computing Science. He returned to Cambridge in January 2000, to join the Microsoft Research laboratory, initially as a Researcher. He changed role to Research Software Development Engineer in 2006.

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